All programming at The African American Library at the Gregory School is free and open to the public. For more information, visit: www.houstonlibrary.org/events
or call 832-393-1440.

About Us


The African American Library at the Gregory School Scholars in Residence 2016

     

The African American Library at the Gregory School partnered with one of Houston's leading research universities to launch its Scholar-in-Residence Program in partnership with Rice University's CERCL (Center for Engaged Learning and Collaborative Learning. Formerly known as Houston Enriches Rice Education, the HERE Project has become the Center for Engaged Research and Collaborative Learning (CERCL) and is now a part of Rice's Kinder Institute for Urban Research.

CERCL is a curricular and research initiative that uses innovative research, engaged pedagogy and other approaches to promote and advance creative models and practices of leadership benefiting new generations of leaders.

Founded by Dr. Anthony Pinn, the Anges Cullen Arnold Professor of Humanities, CERCL works to strengthen connections between the university and the greater Houston community.
The Gregory School's Scholars-in-Residence program assists fellows whose research can benefit from extended access to Gregory School's archives and other HPL resources. 
For more information visit http://cercl.rice.edu/Scholars-in-Residence/

The 2016 Gregory School Scholar in Residence fellows are Dr. Jesus Jesse Esparza and David Ponton, III.  Dr. Jesus Jesse Esparza is a Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Texas Southern University.  He received his Ph.D. in 2008 in History from the University of Houston.  His area of expertise is on the history of Chicano / Latino education in the United States and is currently working on a manuscript entitled Race Schools: Latino, Asian, and Black Educational Autonomy and Activism in Texas, 1920-1980 that offers a comparative analysis of Latino, Asian, and African American-owned schools in Texas since the end of World War I through the post-civil rights era. 

David Ponton, III is a doctoral candidate in Department of History at Rice University. He earned his BA in Religion from Princeton University, where he also received certification in African American Studies and secondary social studies education.  His current research focuses on residential segregation, Cold War-era transformations of race and racism, and the criminalization of space in mid-twentieth century Houston.   


Texas Southern University (TSU)
Student Research Presentations

 

December 2015

Students from Dr. Jesse Esparza’s Texas History course at TSU conducted research at the African American Library at the Gregory School this semester. Each student was assigned a specific archival collection from which they were to select an item representative of Houston’s history and write an essay. This opportunity for hands-on archival research has culminated in a digital exhibit showcasing African American history in Texas. A select group of students shared their work with us.

 


University of Houston - Downtown (UHD)
Student Curriculum Presentations

December 2015

In partnership with UHD’s Department of Urban Education, students in Dr. Bernardo Pohl’s Social Studies Methods course have been working last semester to create learning activities based on the African American Library at the Gregory School permanent galleries. These next generation educators presented their group curriculum projects to the library. Their materials will be available to K-12 teachers and student groups who would like to incorporate our resources into their lesson plans.

 


The African American Library at the Gregory School's Scholars-in-Residence program

October 3, 2015

Portia Hopkins and Uzma Quraishi presented their original research conducted at the Gregory School. Dr. Quraishi present her research titled "Together at the Margins: Shared Struggles and Affinities Between Houston's African Americans and South Asians". Ms. Hopkins' lecture was titled "Dangerous Ground: Assessing the Destruction of African American History in Texas' Textbooks".

The African American Library at the Gregory School partnered with one of Houston's leading research universities to launch its Scholar-in-Residence Program in partnership with Rice University's CERCL (Center for Engaged Learning and Collaborative Learning. Formerly known as Houston Enriches Rice Education, the HERE Project has become the Center for Engaged Research and Collaborative Learning (CERCL) and is now a part of Rice's Kinder Institute for Urban Research.

CERCL is a curricular and research initiative that uses innovative research, engaged pedagogy and other approaches to promote and advance creative models and practices of leadership benefiting new generations of leaders.
Founded by Dr. Anthony Pinn, the Anges Cullen Arnold Professor of Humanities, CERCL works to strengthen connections between the university and the greater Houston community.
The Gregory School's Scholars-in-Residence program assists fellows whose research can benefit from extended access to Gregory School's archives and other HPL resources. 
For more information visit http://cercl.rice.edu/Scholars-in-Residence/




The Jemima Code: Two Centuries of African American Cookbooks


September 26, 2015

Throughout history, black cooks have not been acknowledged for the great food that they prepared while doing their jobs. The award-winning food and nutrition journalist Toni Tipton-Martin shared her newest book, The Jemima Code: Two Centuries of African American Cookbooks. The Jemima Code looks beyond ingredient lists and instructions toreveal culinary competencies and artistry not often associated with black cooks. It is an inspiring testament to African American cooks, as well as an invaluable bibliography andwork of cultural archaeology.


Toni Tipton-Martin



The Slocum Massacre of 1910


September 19, 2015

This program was about Slocum, TX which was a predominantly African American town with several citizens owning vast amounts of property, stores and other businesses. A dispute over a debt ignited racialized violence that eventually left approximately 200 African Americans dead.
Guest speakers were author E.R. Bills and historian Reggie Browne, with remarks by Dr. Malachi Crawford of the University of Houston.


E.R. Bills (left) and Reggie Browne



The Historic Churches of Independence Heights


September 12, 2015

This program covered seven historic churches of Independence Heights that served as the spiritual cornerstone and cultural foundation of this historic community. Mr. Stephen Salmon shared clips of his documentary on the McCulloughs, one of Independence Heights' founding families.


Stephen Salmon and Reverend Alfred McCullough



Booker T. Washington High School Alumni Program


August 2015

Opened in 1893, Booker T. Washington High School was established in Houston's Fourth Ward as "Colored High." Until the mid-1920's, this was the only black high school in Houston, TX. The alumni of Booker T. Washington High School have made notable contributions to the city of Houston, the state of Texas and the world. The Class of 1971 and Class of 1959 were the guest speakers for the event.


Current Principal Carlos Phillips II 


Booker T. Washington Alumni


Houston and Negro Baseball


June 2015

Baseball historian Mike Vance shared the story of Houston's Negro baseball league, The Eagles. He is the co-author of the book Houston Baseball: The Early Years 1861-1961 which shares the rich heritage of Houston's black baseball team.

 

The Kitchen Diva


Angela, the Kitchen Diva brought her soul and a little sass to her newest collection of recipes. Her talk included a demonstration of heart healthy meals and snacks, as well as meals beneficial to diabetics. Angela is also the author of over 90 children's books and six other cookbooks.

 

Donor Appreciation


The programming for June highlighted the 150th Anniversary of Juneteenth with guest speaker Professor Angela Holder. There was also special recognition of Gregory School archival donors. Past donors were thanked for their contributions to the Gregory School while others were encouraged to give to the growing archive. Oral histories were also highlighted as a method of capturing the history of the African American community in Houston. Professor Holder shared a detailed account of the Camp Logan riots and munity which occurred in 1917 in Houston.   

 


 

History of the Buffalo Soldiers

May 2015

May was military appreciation month and the Gregory School commemorated this month with a guest speaker from The Buffalo Soldiers museum Captain Paul Matthews. The captain shared the details of the Camp Logan riot which occurred in 1917 at the present day Memorial Park. Capt. Matthews gave insight on what the soldiers endured when they came from the north to protect the fort in Texas. Guests were able to get an up close view of the artifacts of that time which included a grenade and some clothing worn by the soldiers of that era.

 

We Fly: Blacks in Aviation





The Bronze Flying Eagles Club of Texas came to the Gregory School to share the purpose of their club, which included highlighting the history of Blacks in the military as well as bring awareness to careers in aviation. The group was founded with roots leading back to the Tuskegee airmen and has chapters throughout Texas.

 


 

The African American Library at the Gregory School Scholars in Residence 2015

     

The African American Library at the Gregory School partnered with one of Houston's leading research universities to launch its Scholar-in-Residence Program in partnership with Rice University's CERCL (Center for Engaged Learning and Collaborative Learning.

Formerly known as Houston Enriches Rice Education, the HERE Project has become the Center for Engaged Research and Collaborative Learning (CERCL) and is now a part of Rice's Kinder Institute for Urban Research.
CERCL is a curricular and research initiative that uses innovative research, engaged pedagogy and other approaches to promote and advance creative models and practices of leadership benefiting new generations of leaders.
Founded by Dr. Anthony Pinn, the Anges Cullen Arnold Professor of Humanities, CERCL works to strengthen connections between the university and the greater Houston community.

The Gregory School's Scholars-in-Residence program assists fellows whose research can benefit from extended access to Gregory School's archives and other HPL resources. For more information visit http://cercl.rice.edu/Scholars-in-Residence/

The 2015 Gregory School Scholar in Residence fellows are Portia Hopkins and Uzma Quraishi. Portia D. Hopkins is a PhD candidate in American Studies. She is the recipient of the St. Clair Wright Endowed Scholarship and the Bode-Wise Fellowship at the University of Maryland. Before pursuing her doctorate she earned a Bachelors in History from Texas Christian University in 2006 and a Masters in American Studies from the University of Alabama in 2008. Uzma Quraishi is Assistant Professor of History at Sam Houston State University. Having received her PhD from the Department of History at Rice University and MA at the University of Houston, she teaches and works on racial formation in the American South after 1965, urban history, the history of immigration to Houston, and ethnic and diasporic identities. 


The African American Library at the Gregory School
receives the TOHA Community Award

The African American Library at the Gregory School received the TOHA Community Award on Saturday, October 18, 2014.
READ THE FULL ARTICLE


Dr. Michael Botson discusses his book
Labor, Civil Rights, and the Hughes Tool Company.

October 18, 2014


Dr. Michael Botson presents the Texas Oral History Association's 2014 Mary Faye Barnes Award for Community Oral History to Adrienne Cain on behalf of the African American Library at the Gregory School.


 

The African American Library at the Gregory School's
Scholars-in-Residence program

September 2014


Scholar-in-Residence Naomi Carrier


Scholar-in-Residence Portia Hopkins

 

The African American Library at the Gregory School partnered with one of Houston's leading research universities to launch its Scholar-in-Residence Program in partnership with Rice University's CERCL (Center for Engaged Learning and Collaborative Learning.

Formerly known as Houston Enriches Rice Education, the HERE Project has become the Center for Engaged Research and Collaborative Learning (CERCL) and is now a part of Rice's Kinder Institute for Urban Research.

CERCL is a curricular and research initiative that uses innovative research, engaged pedagogy and other approaches to promote and advance creative models and practices of leadership benefiting new generations of leaders.

Founded by Dr. Anthony Pinn, the Anges Cullen Arnold Professor of Humanities, CERCL works to strengthen connections between the university and the greater Houston community.

The Gregory School's Scholars-in-Residence program assists fellows whose research can benefit from extended access to Gregory School's archives and other HPL resources.
For more information visit http://cercl.rice.edu/Scholars-in-Residence/


"Making the Connection:
Challenges of Tracing Enslaved Ancestors"

 

June 28, 2014



This presentation reviewed resources for beginner and intermediate level African-American genealogical research. The discussion explored the history, current conditions, and notable people buried in some of Houston's historic African American cemeteries.


"Women of Color in the Armed Forces:
From Invisible to Invincible"

 

May 24, 2014


Women of color who have served in the US Armed forces have a very storied history, but much of it is untold which leaves many unaware. Marylyn Harris, Camellia Jackson, 1st Lt. Johnnie Rainwater and Sgt. Priscilla Dufilho discuss how the military has shaped them into the women and citizens they are today.  


 

Apr. 8, 2014
The Houston Chronicle


Photo By Pin Lim/Freelance
http://www.chron.com/neighborhood/heights/news/article/Library-a-source-on-local-black-historyAfrican-5386238.php#photo-6046004
- Lindsay Peyton


"The Other Great Migration"

Feb. 8, 2014

Dr. Bernadette Pruitt, History Professor at Sam Houston State University, discusses her book "The Other Great Migration: The Movement of Rural African American's to Houston, 1900-1941".



Celebrating Black History Month at
the African American Library at the Gregory School

Feb. 4th, 2014


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Oral History: A Shared Authority
Dr. Michael H. Frisch (University of Buffalo)

Dec. 7th, 2013

Dr. Michael H. Frisch discusses new tools for digital indexing of audio and video oral histories.


 

African American Library at the Gregory School
4th Anniversary: Open House/Alumni Day

Nov. 16, 2013

Alumni gather for a group photo.


Hip Hop in Houston:
The Origin and the Legacy by Maco L. Faniel

Sept. 28th, 2013

Author, Maco L. Faniel, discusses the early years of Houston hip-hop from the music to the culture it inspired.

 

W.E.B. Du Bois, Texas, and the Black Freedom Struggle:
Racial Justice in the Lone Star State

Sept. 21, 2013

The 2013 Scholar-in-Residence, Dr. Phillip Sinitiere, discusses W.E.B. Du Bois' important role in the quest for racial justice in Texas.


 

50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

August 3, 2013

Dr. Virgil A. Wood (seated left) presented and moderated a cross-generational dialogue of the "I Have a Dream" legacy and the ongoing challenges to freedom and equality in American society.


 

African American Burial Grounds of Greater Houston

July 13, 2013

Mr. George Allen, president of the Red River Sankofa Historical Society, spoke about the history, current conditions and notable people buried in some of the historic cemeteries such as College Memorial Park, Olivewood, Evergreen, and others.



An Afternoon with Dr. Karen Kossie-Chernyshev

June 22, 2013

Dr. Karen Kossie-Chernyshev spoke about her book Recovering Five Generations Hence: The Life and Writing of Lillian Jones Horace.

 



The Negro Spiritual: Soundtrack of Our Journey

June 15, 2013

Through music and discussion, presenters provided a preview and socio-historical context for Houston Ebony Opera Guild's Summer Concert.

 



African American Genealogical Research:
Challenges of Tracing Enslaved Ancestors

           

June 8, 2013



Debra Sloan spoke about available resources for beginning and intermediate African American genealogical research.


DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.: HIS LIFE AND HIS LEGACY

January 26, 2013



Rev. Dr. Virgil Wood (Seated right) and Rev. Dr. William A. Lawson presented an up-close and personal account of their intimate interaction with the legendary Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during the civil rights era.

 


MUSICIAN REGGIE QUINERLY

 

December 29, 2012  

Reggie Quinerly performed music from his album, Music Inspired by Freedman Town. Originally from Houston, Texas, Reggie Quinerly began playing the drums at an early age. After graduating from the renowned High School for the Visual and Performing Arts (HSPVA) he made his transition into the New York jazz scene, continuing his studies at the New School University. Another recent achievement includes the completion of his Master's degree from The Juilliard School's Jazz division.

 


 

TUSKEGEE AIRMEN PANEL DISCUSSION

October 24, 2012 


As we celebrated and honored the legacy of the Tuskegee Airmen. A panel of several distinguished Tuskegee Airmen discussed the challenges and triumphs of being the first African-American aviators in the United States armed forces. In sponsorship with Houston Museum of African American Culture (HMAAC)

 


 

THE LAND REVEALS HISTORY

September 15, 2012


Scholar-In-Residence Jenny Meeden Bailey lectures on the lives of the people buried at College Memorial Park Cemetery on W. Dallas and how the cemetery's history tells an indispensable part of the Houston and American story.

 


 

 

HANDS ON WITH THE HARMONICA

February 20, 2012

Houston's top harmonica bluesman, Sonny Boy Terry, was on hand at the African American Library at the Gregory School to give lessons to aspiring young blues musicians. As part of the demonstration, participants were given their very own harmonica, with instructions on how to play the positions and keys.

As an added bonus, Sonny Boy Terry performed  Bo Diddley's "I'm a Man" , War's  "Low Rider", and other well known blues standards in which the audience was encouraged to participate. The program was provided courtesy of the Society for the Performing Arts. 

 


 

THANKS TO OUR COMMUNITY PARTNERS

February 20, 2012


The African Library at the Gregory School salutes team members Andrea Judge, Sharon Thomas, Sharon Spinks, Deborah Hines, Josephine Ross, Bianchi Veal, and Erhonda Thomas of Exxon Mobil for volunteering their time and services by helping the digital and archival departments.

The members were assigned various archival and digital tasks, such as collection inventory, working with the archival databases, and inputting information for scanned photographs, to give them a "behind the scenes" look in the day in the life of an archivist.

 

 


EXPLORING THE 1917 CAMP LOGAN RIOT'S
CONNECTION TO HOUSTON

Karen Rosenthall, Scholar-in-Residence

There have been very few accounts written on the events of the 1917 Camp Logan Riot. Rather than attempt to recreate an accurate history based on sparse evidence or try to defend the actions of those involved in the riot, this examination will look at the rhetoric of both contemporary and retrospective accounts that show a significant contrast between how the 1917 Riot was preserved within in city memory and how it was recorded within the annals of city, state, and national history.

 



Scholars-in-residence Program

August 29, 2011 -

The African American Library at the Gregory School partnered with one of Houston's leading research universities to launch its Scholar-in-Residence Program in partnership with Rice University's HERE (Houston Enriches Rice Education) project.

Founded by Dr. Anthony Pinn, the Anges Cullen Arnold Professor of Humanities, the HERE project is an innovative curricula and research initiative that works to strengthen connections between the university and the greater Houston community.

The Gregory School's Scholars-in-Residence program assists fellows whose research can benefit from extended access to Gregory School's archives and other HPL resources.

For more information visit http://here.rice.edu/Scholars-in-Residence/
The inaugural fellow, Karen Rosenthall, expressed excitement about the opportunity and believes "the opportunity to do archival research utilizing the oral histories and primary resource data collected at the Gregory School will offer an invaluable resource of actual voices depicting the thread of indifference in class and social dynamics as understood by African Americans". Her first public lecture will take place at Rice University September 16th, 7pm.

 

 


 

"The Lawson Love Letters"